RFDefence®

"Potential" of a drone

Views: 34 Author: Marcia Goodrich Publish Time: Origin: Michigan Tech

Drone threat

In January 2015, a Washington, DC, hobbyist accidentally flew his DJI Phantom quadcopter drone over the White House fence and crashed it on the lawn.

Two years earlier, a prankster sent his drone toward German prime minister Angela Merkel during a campaign rally.

Small drones have also proven to be effective tools of mischief that doesn’t make the national news, from spying to smuggling to hacking. So when Mo Rastgaar was watching World Cup soccer and heard about snipers protecting the crowd, he doubted that they’d fully understood a drone’s potential.

“I thought, ‘If the threat is a drone, you really don’t want to shoot it down—it might contain explosives and blow up. What you want to do is catch it and get it out of there.’”

Drone defense jammer

Today, there are various types of drone catchers now in service, a well-known model which with a launcher that shoots a big net attached to a large drone by a string. The system can be autonomous, controlled by a ground-based human pilot or a combination of the two. But there is a significant bug in this system is that if the intrusive drone was carrying a bomb, the controller still can active the dangerous thing even the drone got caught. So the priority concern should be focusing on how to cut off the connection between the drone's donor and remote unit.

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